Title

Am I My Mother’s Keeper? Children as Unexpected Sources of Social Support Among African American Women Living With HIV-AIDS

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Black Studies

Publication Date

2012

Date Added

2022-07-12

Abstract

HIV-AIDS continues to be an escalating health problem, particularly among women. In the United States, African American women are among the leading demographic groups for HIV prevalence. African American women represent 65% of the total women living with HIV-AIDS. The typical woman with HIV-AIDS is young, in her 20s, economically challenged, and of childbearing age. Adherence to HIV therapies is critical if patients are to achieve and maintain virologic suppression. Adherence is especially significant for women, who are often the gatekeepers of care for the family. Scholars have long recognized the importance of social support for general health and well-being. This study explores unexpected sources of social support among women living with HIV-AIDS and how social support networks may affect medication adherence, health, and well-being. Young children were identified as social actors of care.

DOI

10.1177/0021934712440171

Keywords

Health

Disciplines

Public Health

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